New England’s Mohawk Trail

March 12th, 2012 by Applegate Inn

The Mohawk Trail became the first scenic road in New England in 1914, and it has been sharing great views, history, and culture with motorists and bicyclists ever since.

Long before it became a road, The Mohawk Trail was a well-worn foot path used by Native Americans and then colonists. Metacomet, called King Philip, traveled “The Trail” some time around 1676. Benedict Arnold followed in his footsteps nearly 100 years later. It is thrilling for American history buffs to travel The Trail today.

The current Mohawk Trail spans more than 60 miles and travels through 50,000 acres of state parks and forests. It stretches from the Massachusetts-New York border to Millers Falls on the Connecticut River; in between, there are over 100 attractions worth exploring.

Berkshires Inn near Mohawk Trail State Forest.

The Mohawk Trail State Forest.

Visit the Bridge of Flowers, which spans the Deerfield River. Once a trolley bridge, it is now home to an amazing of flowers and shrubs. Spring is a lovely time to see the Bridge of Flowers.

Also worth a look is the Natural Bridge, in North Adams. The 60 ft. marble falls is a testament to the power of nature, time, and erosion. Another interesting geological site is Salmon Falls, which has the largest number of glacial potholes in the country.

Williamstown and North Adams sit on the Mohawk Trail and Mount Greylock looms to the south of The Trail. Numerous hiking trails are accessible from The Trail, as are several scenic points. Stop at the observation point on Western Summit, near the Hairpin Turn, for stunning views of Mount Greylock, Mount Prospect, Mount Williams, and everything in between.

Many people get a touch a wanderlust in the spring. If you do, come the Berkshires. Follow in the footsteps of history and travel The Mohawk Trail.

We hope you’ll stay at our Berkshires Bed and Breakfast in Lee during your travels.

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