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Category Archives: Berkshire Art Exhibits

Out of Site! – Contemporary Outdoor Sculpture at Chesterwood

June 16, 2017 by Corey A. Edwards

Out of Site! – Contemporary Outdoor Sculpture at ChesterwoodArt in the Berkshires is never far away and the warmth of summer brings out some of the best. Chesterwood is currently presenting “Out of Site,” a contemporary outdoor sculpture exhibition that no art lover should miss.

Chesterwood is a National Trust Historic Site preserving the country home and studio of Daniel Chester French (1850-1931). French is considered America’s foremost sculptor of public monuments. He sculpted the Minute Man monument in Concord and the the Lincoln Memorial Abraham Lincoln, among other works.

The 122 acre estate now serves as a popular museum and sculpture garden. The facility hosts numerous events and programs throughout the year, including an annual contemporary sculpture exhibition.

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The Architects of Saturday Morning: Hanna-Barbera At The Norman Rockwell Museum

November 7, 2016 by Corey A. Edwards

Hanna-Barbera At The Norman Rockwell MuseumWhat do Tom and Jerry, Scooby-Doo, The Flintstones, Yogi Bear, and Jonny Quest all have in common? They’re all at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge! Come see Hanna-Barbera: The Architects Of Saturday Morning, November 12th through May 29th, 2017!

If you have spent any time watching cartoons on your television since 1957, you’re undoubtedly familiar with the work of William Hanna and Joseph Barbera. From “The Ruff and Reddy Show” (1957) to “The Powerpuff Girls” (1998), the list of properties they’re responsible for bringing to life is astounding.

Given this rich history, it is surprising to learn that the current exhibition at the Norman Rockwell Museum is the first ever to focus on this award-winning animation team.

Hanna-Barbera: The Architects Of Saturday Morning focuses mainly on the animation studio’s golden years: classic shows like those already mentioned and Huckleberry Hound, Quick Draw McGraw, The Jetsons, Magilla Gorilla, Top Cat, and The Herculoids.

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The Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas Weekend

November 22, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Stockbridge Mainstreet At Christmas Weekend

Norman Rockwell working on Stockbridge Mainstreet At Christmas
1967 photo by Louie Lamone
courtesy of the Norman Rockwell Museum

Step into one of Norman Rockwell’s most famous paintings at the annual Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas Weekend, December 5 – 7, 2014!

Stockbridge, Massachusetts is like many small towns in the Berkshires: quiet, friendly, quaint, and so picturesque it looks like it could be right out of some Norman Rockwell painting.

Where Stockbridge differs is that it IS in a Norman Rockwell painting! Many of them, actually, but most famously in his “Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas.”

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Berkshire Museum’s Festival of Trees 2014

November 15, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Berkshire Museum's Festival of Trees 2014Berkshire Museum’s annual Festival of Trees exhibit – on view from November 14th through January 4th, 2015 – will take you into the wild with this year’s theme “On Safari!”

The much-anticipated, 30th annual Festival of Trees – On Safari will feature creatively bedecked Christmas trees sponsored and created by local businesses, schools, and community organizations.

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Edward Hopper at the Norman Rockwell Museum

September 13, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

The Unknown Hopper: Edward Hopper as Illustrator at the Norman Rockwell MuseumProminent American artist Edward Hopper was known primarily for his realistic oil paintings but the current Norman Rockwell Museum exhibit presents his lesser known side with “The Unknown Hopper: Edward Hopper as Illustrator.”

Edward Hopper’s realist paintings are touchstones of the American twentieth century. His images have become an integral part of the very grain of the American experience, and his work continues to reflect and express classic American scenes and sensibilities. How ironic is it, then, that his career as illustrator, which came after his first, one-person exhibition of paintings in 1920, is largely ignored and glossed over?

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